Services

 

Watch Servicing

 

Mechanical watches require routine servicing in order to prevent excessive wear to the movement components, it is also important to maintain the accuracy and function. The majority of mechanical watches require a service around every 4 to 5 years. Often, mechanical watches are only sent for service when they stop, or when an accident forces them in for repair. At Simon Freese Watchmakers, we have may years of experience in servicing procedures,  in order to restore the watch to optimum functional condition. Servicing prices start at £160, a typical service would usually include:

 

 

Movement service

Ultrasonic case and bracelet clean

Light refinishing of case and bracelet if required

Replacement of seals

Testing for water resistance

18 month guarantee

 

 

Feel free to get in touch if you would like an indication of cost prior to sending your watch in to us.

 

 

 

Battery and reseal

 

Many luxury watch manufacturers utilise quartz movements, we offer a swift and efficient battery and reseal service, avoiding the long time scales that many manufacturers stipulate. In order to ease the process we offer a postal pack service, allowing insured and safe delivery of your watch to us. Typically a battery and reseal procedure would cost £40, to include:

 

Pre-paid postal pack delivered to your door

Correct Swiss battery fitted in accordance with manufacturers specifications

Ultrasonic case and bracelet clean

water resistance testing

12 month guarantee on work undertaken

Insured next day return post

 

We can usually send out a postal pack on the same day of the enquiry, and return the watch within one week. 

 

 

 

Case and bracelet Refurbishment

 

We offer a complete case and bracelet refurbishment service, including case lapping for starburst finishes.

 

 

 

                                             

                                                                          Restoration   

 

 

At Simon Freese Watchmakers, we regard restoration as a process of returning a watch in to the best possible condition, whilst retaining its originality and individual character. Of equal importance is the dialogue between the client and the watchmaker, to acheive the best result. In order to acheive this goal, we regard the following as essential elements of any restoration:

 

 

1. An initial discussion between client and watchmaker, to establish the required result, and to set out clearly an itinery of specific repair     requirements.

 

2. Close examination of the overall condition, to make sure that the required result can be acheived.

 

3. A generous allowance of time to allow for the restoration process to be undertaken without constraint.

 

4. Complete disassembly of the movement, and the replacement of any movement parts that are found to be worn.

 

5. Careful attention to the aesthetic details of the watch, to ensure that the overall character and value of the watch is enchanced.

 

6. Case and bracelet refinishing to be only undertaken when it is required by the client and not detrimental to the value of the watch.

 

6A period of testing after the repair that allows all mechanical tolerances to be tested thoroughly.

 

7. A mutual understanding of reasonable costs in light of the time required and value added by the restoration process.

 

                                                         Time Scales

 

 

In light of the extensive nature of restoration, we would normally expect a time scale of two to three months, taking in to account our usual work queue and the time taken to obtain and make parts as required. please feel free to get in touch if you have any special requirements in this regard, as we will always endeavour to assist where possible.

                                                             

                                                                                      

                                            

 

 

 

                                       

Simon Freese Watchmakers Limited

Print Print | Sitemap
© Simon Freese